Freud – Mini Review

So Netflix recentl released a new series called Freud and while I didn’t give it much thought at first, my mom went crazy due to the fact that it’s about the young Sigmund Freud and is set in Vienna. That might not be anything special, but since my grandmother spent a great deal of her childhood in Vienna and I’ve spent every August in our house there, since my mum was very interested in the psychologist Freud and his invention of the psychoanalysis and her best friend is a psychology professor – well, my mum and I watched the series. Long story short, here’s a mini review!

ORF/Netflix-Serie "Freud" - WIEN – Jetzt. Für immer

The series is about young Dr. Freud, before his success discovering the psychoanalysis. He’s still a stundent at the hospital in Vienna, where his methods of hypnosis are being laughed at. He struggles with his professor and his fellow classmates. When a young girl is missing and he meets a strange woman saying she knows where the girl is hidden because of her special abilities, he hypnotices her, prooving that his method works. Not only does she know the correct location of the girl and he’s able to contact the police, but he also discovers her special ability of having visions and thereby forseeing the future. Together they find themselves in a twisted game full of murder, abuse, spirits and a threat to the Austrian-Hungarian Empire right in the middle of it all…

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.
Freud bei Netflix: Die Kritik zur Serie um Sigmund Freud

To be honest, this series took quite an unexpected turn: it consists of eight episodes each 50 minutes long. Beforehand, I expected this to be some sort of biography on Freud’s life, his achievements, rise to fame, importance in psychology – something like that. During the first episode, I thought it covered his life before he was famous struggling to gain respect and making a name for himself. Then after one or two epsisodes, I thought it’s about him helping the Vienna police investigate in a what appears to be a series of connected murders together with the young woman with special visions. Then, about half-way into the series it took the turn toward the “parents” of the oung woman, Hungarians, trying to get the Empire to fall. And then there were all the supernatural things like the visions and rituals and demons at the end – in other words, very disturbing…

My mother loved the series because, as she explained to me, it perfectly displayed the mentality and happenings in the Austrian-Hungarian Empire in the late nineteenth century. And, she loved the story of young Freud. And all the settings in Vienna and Austrians in general. And she didn’t seem to mind the disturbing scenes of visions and rituals and all the supernatural stuff and nothing at all concering the real life of Freud.

So, I ended up giving it 3.5 stars because it was not what I expected and during some scenes, I was pretty grossed out. It was also not part of the description and so I was shocked by the development and actual plot of the series. However, to be fair, it was gripping and the plot was suspenseful and multilayered and so it was not all bad.

Recommendable: certainly depends on what you’re looking for!

When you’re looking for a series a little more concentrating on the psychology aspect as well as Freud’s life, then you’re wrong here. However, when you’re looking for a gripping and dark murder series full of conspiracy, duells, strange rituals and demons and need something gripping and suspenseful to watch, this is the series. It just wasn’t what I was looking for and so that’s wh 3.5 was my reaction!

Author: Blogger Books

I'm a huge fan of Draco Malfoy, I love scones and tea time, I don't like horror movies and obviously I'm a huge book nerd.

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