Books I can read over and over again

There are some books you read which you throw in your bookshelf and never acknowledge again. Then there might be books you actually enjoyed but don’t feel the need to read again. Then, and those are the most important ones, you own books which are so brilliantly written you can read them over and over again! Here’s a list of books in my bookshelf which I can read OVRER AND OVER AGAIN: Continue reading “Books I can read over and over again”

WAR STORM – Review

I can’t express the feelings overwhelming me right now, the minutes after I finally finished one of my favorite book series ever. I’ve waited what felt like thousand years for Victoria Aveyard to finally tell the story of Mare Barrow – and she killed it. The fourth and final book of the RED QUEEN series is absolutely stunning, with great turning points, incredible dialogues and a fantastic ending. This book is probably the best I’ve read this year and the defiantly best of the series. After KING’S CAGE has not really won me over, this book has really made me cry – in so many ways.

After Cal has chosen his crown over her and the revolution, Mare has to protect her heart from everything that is coming her way. She is determined to overthrow the kingdom and ending the reign of the boy who has caused her so much pain: Maven. But the Scarlet Guard can’t end the long lasting suppression of the reds without allies, and so she must side with the boy who broke her heart: alongside Cal and his silver allies, she tries to overrun a kingdom that has caused the death of so many innocent.

The battle between Reds and Silvers, heirs and slaves, Mare and Maven. Victoria Aveyard has really made the impossible possible: with this epic conclusion to this heartwearming series she COMPLETELY convinced me!

SPOILER ALERT (anyone who wants to read this book do not read this paragraph):

At the end, Mare and Maven fight one on one and Mare survives, having no memory of what happened to Maven. I’ve always wanted to believe that somebody could still cure Maven and rip his mother’s part out of him, leaving his beautiful and carrying soul. But with the book ending, Maven can not be cured and dies at the end. Or does he, because Mare doesn’t know if or where he is still alive… I’ve heard that Cal could have helped his brother survive and is keeping him save and captive without Mare knowing…Epic Reads!!!  

Sooooooo, at the end, Maven MAY be dead – but deep in my heart I wanted him to be nice. Don’t get me wrong, I love Cal and Mare together and will always hope the lightning girl and the Chlore prince have a future – but Victoria Aveyard gave me the burgeoning hope that Maven could still have a heart – but nothing.

SPOILER ALERT END

However, she really gave this story an epic finale with Norta becoming a free republic, although the end of Norta isn’t really mentioned. Another thing that I really respect of Victoria Aveyard is the liberal perspective of sexuality:

Evangeline Samos is gay. That is a really cool thing to write, considering the homophobia in this world. Being able to live your sexuality in the free Republic of Montfort, Evangeline, Elane (her girlfriend) and her brother Ptolemus run away from their parents, turning their backs on Norta and the Kingdom of the Rift. I’ve hated Evangeline the first two books because she was such a devious witch considering Mare and the redblooded, with her silver pride and her “soon to be queen” perspective. But during this book, one becomes to see the human side of her – being controlled by her parents, living a life that is forbidden in her country – loving a girl – and having to marry a boy she doesn’t love.

Do you know the principle of many people telling a story – each person tells one chapter – but there is actually just one main character. Am I the only one who wants to skip the chapters with the boring people and just wanting to read what the main character has to say? Well, this book was different. I still love Mare’s story the most but this book was the only book that didn’t bore me when Evangeline and Iris were telling their story.

So – all in for one – this book threw me over in the best possible way and I recommend it to everyone who likes a strong female character, a revolution and fighting for their rights!

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The Penderwicks at last

If someone would ask me what has most influenced my early years (but I doubt anyone ever will), I’d say this family. I have been reading Jeanne Birdsall’s Penderwicks since I was five years old and they have had a major impact on my life. This is the reason why I was so enormously thrilled to finally see the fifth book in store!

Continue reading “The Penderwicks at last”

After Iris – The Gadsby Siblings – Review

A family full of love, tragedy, laughter and fun – sounds just like the Gadsby Family, Natasha Farrant created. Three years after the tragic death of her twin sister Iris, Bluebell Gadsby (13 years) is still filled with grief. With her parents always flying on business trips and her being invisible in school, not even her three siblings can help her get out of misery. However, it all begins to change with the appearance of her new neighbor Joss, who is in fact, not as bad as she thought he was.

This book tells the tragic story of a broken family with so many funny and loving side stories that you can’t help but fall in love with this book. Besides the heartbreaking story of the dead sister, this book also brings up the perks of being a teenager: bullying in school, fighting with your siblings and first love.

While Joss starts off with just being a great friend for Bluebell, she soon realizes she is falling in love with her three year older neighbor. But not only she seems to like the new boy in town, so does her 16 year old sister Flora.                                                                      After the death of Iris, Bluebell started to become invisible in class. She neither talked to anyone nor did she keep her old friendships up.

Without spoiling more, let me just say that this book is fantastic to read on a daily basis due to its simple but great writing and funny stories!

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TOP 10 – Review

Have you ever made a list of the TOP 10 most hilarious/ funniest / most awkward moments of your life? This book counts down the TOP 10 moments of the friendship between the two high school graduates Ryan and Gabby.

Ryan and Gabby are completely, one hundred percent different: Ryan is a popular hockey player who has had NUMEROUS girlfriend which never lasted longer than a week. Gabby however is struggling with anxiety and fear. She is afraid of anything involving parties, attention or conversation with strangers. Two completely different characters and the story of a great friendship is told by Katie Cotugno.

The interesting part about this book is the order it is told in. It is not told from beginning to the end nor from the end to the beginning but separated by the importance of their friendship. Therefore there are moments where you can’t be certain you understood the meaning – but you’ll find out in the next sequel.

Katie Cotugno writes with such a passion and simplicity which not many authors are capable of. She makes her characters come to life and makes you love them. This book is perfect for a short trip or a couple of relaxed days by the pool because it can be read any time and everywhere!

I can not longer write about this book without spoiling important facts: just go read it yourself!

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The Case for Jamie – Review

What’s a WATSON without his HOLMES? It’s actually a good question if thinking of the Reichenbachfall. Watson was clearly moving on but still held on to every memory that didn’t involve anything bad about his beloved Holmes – trying to hold on to the good stuff. Not quite in this book. After the tragic ending of The Last of August, the third novel of the Charlotte Holmes Series takes place one year after.

Continue reading “The Case for Jamie – Review”

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children – Review

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is one of the most imaginative novels I have experienced yet. This strange novel – and by strange I mean a good strange – is perfectly added to the photographs which accompany the story. This book is as much strange as it is unforgettable because you haven’t seen anything this peculiar in your life.

It tells the story of the 15 year old Jacob who has been shown these weird and strange photos by his grandfather since being a little kid. With his grandfather being a jewish kid during the second world war and being raised in an orphanage in England, Jacob starts to believe the stories of his grandfather about these peculiar children. But with growing older, he begins to think the pictures of girls throwing a huge stone or a boy with bees coming out of his mouth are myths and his grandfather is trying to tease him.

But when he finds his grandfather dead in the forest his life is about to change… Not only seeing a monster at the crime scene but also the strange last words from his grandfather start to mess up Jacob’s life. His grandfather told him to find the bird and to go to September 3rd 1940 – but what has that to do with his death? Having nightmares about the creature he saw and being unable to get his grandfather’s last words out of his mind, Jacob leaves for the island Cairnholm alongside his father, where seventy years ago, the orphanage stood where his grandfather used to live.

But with every day on the British island, Jacob starts to lose trust in his guts: was it a wrong decision to make a trip to this deserted island trying to understand his grandfather? And why is the orphanage so destroyed and called the haunted house?     Soon he makes discoveries that are about to change his life, starting with the question: can it be possible that these peculiar children are still alive?

This story is nerve – wracking in every perspective: the photographs give you goose bumps, the characters make you smile and the story makes you want to continue… The plot makes your heart race, never the less makes you addicted. It shows the world from a different point of view, of people having to hide because of their diversity, just what we have in this world as well. It opens your eyes on how it is, to be cut off from the lives being lived without living them yourself – because of the hate in this world. It shows the tragic story of a jewish boy loosing his parents and siblings in the war and then loosing his second family as well – never understood by the family he gained along the way…

It is a MUST READ, even though it has some long pages, not as interesting as the rest… It is a series of three books and even though I loved the first book, I am quite ok with the ending and I’m not planning to continue the story!

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Why I am obsessed with John Green

Fair question, but actually not. Probably everyone who has at least read one of his books has seen the high value of his writing, the reflection of his stories and the humor his characters have. So far I have read three books he has written (The Fault in Our Stars, Paper Towns and Turtles all the way down) and I am deeply impressed by his writing skills. Continue reading “Why I am obsessed with John Green”